Reality as Being and Becoming

What do ancient Greek philosophers Heraclitus and Parmenides, the early 20th-century main protagonist of the novel Siddhartha by Herman Hesse, and Latvian writer and poet of the turn of the 20th century known by his pseudonym Rainis have in common? Across centuries and geographies, they all share an idea: a belief that being and becoming are …

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Anaxagoras on Change: Everything Contains Everything

One of the last pre-Socratic philosophers of Ancient Greece, Anaxagoras hailed from the Ionian city of Clazomenae but is notable for being the first one to bring philosophy to Athens. There he taught and flourished for about 30 years until the mid-5th century BCE when he went back to Ionia due to charges brought against …

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What Can Books Teach us About Change?

While still on my journey through hometown, exploring the unknown in the familiar, I wanted to share with you this quote. I saw it at the same exhibition I mentioned previously. It seems to me that it captures the idea of change wonderfully. We all know that change is inevitable in life and yet we …

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People Change and Stay the Same

The title of this article is contradictory on purpose. Do you think that people can change or do you think that they stay fundamentally the same? This question is far less contradictory, isn't it? That is just because it has 'or' in the middle, not 'and'. Indeed, could there be an 'and' in the middle, or, in …

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Trap of Easier Interpretation – the Case of Heraclitus

In our dynamic world, it is easy to misunderstand things, to believe fake news, to allow oneself to be misled. Sometimes it happens due to conscious manipulation by others, other times - all too often - due to our own biases. One of such biases is something I would like to call a trap of easier …

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