Experience vs Thought

If you had a free evening and were offered to read either Romeo and Juliet or a scientific research paper about neurochemical processes people refer to as love, which would you choose? Image from Pixabay It depends on your mood, I suppose, and on your priorities at that particular moment. But I believe I would …

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Culture of Instructions?

What are instructions good for? To present a clear set of actions to follow to attain a certain goal. For example, if I want to successfully assemble any piece of IKEA furniture, I need instructions. Which part goes where and in what order. If I want to learn to drive a car, I need instructions. …

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It Is OK to Feel Good

Photo by Evie Shaffer from Pexels It is OK to feel good. Sounds so obvious and self-explanatory that one doesn't need to be reminded of it. Of course, it is OK to feel good, who doubts that? Who doesn't know that? Well, at times some of us forget about it. I know it from experience.  It happens when …

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Unexpected Importance of Small Things

"If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world."Thorin from "The Hobbit" by J.R.R. Tolkien What sort of things do you pay attention to? Are they the big, the loud, and the colourful? We all have filters that regulate what gets our attention and what …

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Intuitive Beliefs, Cups, and Worldviews

I like a nice cup of good black tea. In fact, one such cup stands in front of me just now as I am typing this. I do not have any doubts about it, I do not need to reflect on it to establish whether it is indeed so. There it is - my cup …

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Our Beliefs Develop in Circles

Have you ever wondered how your beliefs are formed? We all have worldviews that are informed by our beliefs about life. But how are our beliefs created? And by whom? In this article, I explore one possible answer offered by cognitive science. Especially its new branch of inquiry - cognitive science of religion (CSR) - …

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Could Our Beliefs Be an Evolutionary Advantage?

The current world population amounts to approximately 7,8 billion people. You, me, all of us. According to the latest estimations, roughly 85% of us feel affiliated with one of the currently practised religions. The remaining 15% do not necessarily all identify as atheists, some see themselves as agnostic or simply non-religious, having no strong views …

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Common Sense and Truth – Reflections

"How prone to doubt, how cautious are the wise!"  Homer, some 3.000 years ago "The Thinker" by Auguste Rodin, in the Legion's courtyard, San Francisco* How reliable is our common sense? It gets us by on a day-to-day basis mostly without big blunders. So we can agree that common sense is reliable as an adaptability …

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Book Review: “Mind and Cosmos” by Thomas Nagel

Thomas Nagel is a renowned contemporary American philosopher, born in Belgrade (modern-day Serbia) on July 4, 1937. Outside philosophical circles he is perhaps best known for his 1974 essay "What Is It Like to Be a Bat?" where he argues against the material/physical reductionist account of the mind and especially - of consciousness. This remains Nagel's central …

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Being Great to be Good Enough? Philosophical Exploration

Is 'good' good enough? Or is 'great' needed to qualify for being good enough? Although it sounds absurd if taken from a purely logical perspective, it is yet another proof of our inherent complexity that often contains outright contradictions. I know what it feels like to expect and demand greatness from myself simply to feel …

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