Hume’s Dilemma or the Problem on Induction

In the last week's article about deductive and inductive arguments, I mentioned something called Hume's dilemma. In this article, I discuss it in more detail. Here is a short recap of the main idea - the 18th century Scottish Enlightenment philosopher David Hume presented the scientific (and philosophical) community with a challenge: he claimed that …

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Deductive and Inductive Arguments

Last year I wrote two short articles about philosophical arguments - one about what they are and the other about how to evaluate them. This time, I look at two arguably best-known types of arguments and offer their brief introduction - deductive and inductive arguments. Both names refer to the structure of your argument, how …

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Philosophical Argument – how to evaluate its quality?

In the last article I briefly described what a 'philosophical argument' means. This article continues on this, so far, short series and looks at how we can assess the quality of an argument and what it means to say that an argument is valid or sound. As often is the case, it starts with some …

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Philosophical Argument – what is it?

In this article, I would like to explore what is a philosophical argument and what it is made of. It is worth clarifying that by 'argument' I do not mean an angry exchange of accusations or any other type of emotionally heated conflict. So, for starters, we should be clear about what philosophical argument is …

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