Sometimes We Need to Shift Focus

It is fascinating how our minds work. They make connections between seemingly unrelated pieces of information and turn them into original, interesting insights. Afterwards, it can be impossible to explain where you got that great idea from! That`s how creativity works and that is where the roots of our deepest knowledge are hidden. So, sometimes …

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Spreading the Word: Philosophy of Human Fragility

In this week's "Spreading the Word", I share with you an article that I saw today in my inbox. It spoke to me as it may to many others because it tells about our natural, undeniable, inescapable human fragility. The author offers snippets of wisdom by the philosopher Martha Nussbaum about how to live with …

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9 Philosophical Quotes – April Edition

With just a tiny bit of delay, here comes the April edition of selected philosophical quotes. March selection is available here. The goal is simple: take my recent readings, select a bite-size amount of philosophical quotes that caused some reaction in me, publish them here on humanfactor.blog  I am an owl from Pixabay. Here is April …

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Thales of Miletus or the First Greek Philosopher

The first ancient Greek philosopher on record, by the name of Thales, lived and pondered about the nature of things in the city of Miletus some 2,600 years ago. He is among those thinkers who will be called the Pre-Socratics (all who were before Socrates. i.e. a period of ~150 years). Also, he belongs to …

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Before Socrates – Origins of Western Philosophy (Part 2 of 2)

Last week I wrote the first part of this article. In it, I started drawing the historical background leading up to the first recorded ancient Greek philosopher - Thales. In this second part, I finish the article and bring our time journey from its last stop (­~10th/9th century BC) some 300-400 years ahead to the …

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Before Socrates – Origins of Western Philosophy (Part 1 of 2)

It is ironic, really - a man who made it his point to never write down any of his thoughts and claimed that he knew nothing is also the man who is among the most famous western philosophers. One of the "founding fathers", so to speak. I am referring to Socrates, of course. Luckily, his …

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Socrates in Prison and We in Self-Isolation

Many of us are in self-isolation these days and our freedom of movement (and socialising) is restricted. In most cases, it is because our respective governments decided this way. Although we understand the motivation, the reasoning and the purpose of these imposed measures, still - it is a limitation of some of our basic freedoms …

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Spreading the Word: 5 Questions about Free Will

In this week's "Spreading the Word", I share with you a video in which various experts discuss the topic of free will. It is an interview that raises 5 questions to several attendees of the Second International Conference on Neuroscience and Free Will that was held 1 year ago (March 2019). For me, the most …

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10 Philosophical Quotes – March Edition

Here comes the March edition of selected philosophical quotes. February selection is available here. The goal is simple: take my recent readings, select a bite-size amount of philosophical quotes that caused some reaction in me, publish them here on humanfactor.blog  I am an owl from Pixabay. Here is March selection of philosophical quotes. Hope you enjoy them! …

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Trap of Easier Interpretation – the Case of Heraclitus

In our dynamic world, it is easy to misunderstand things, to believe fake news, to allow oneself to be misled. Sometimes it happens due to conscious manipulation by others, other times - all too often - due to our own biases. One of such biases is something I would like to call a trap of easier …

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